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[ "article:topic", "authorname:nwalet", "license:ccbyncsa", "showtoc:no", "Implicit Boundary Conditions" ]
Mathematics LibreTexts

3.2: Implicit Boundary Conditions

  • Page ID
    8359
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    In many physical problems we have implicit boundary conditions, which just mean that we have certain conditions we wish to be satisfied. This is usually the case for systems defined on an infinite definition area. For the case of the Schrödinger equation this usually means that we require the wavefunction to be normalizable. We thus have to disallow the wave function blowing up at infinity. Sometimes we implicitly assume continuity or differentiability. In general one should be careful about such implicit BC’s, which may be extremely important