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Mathematics LibreTexts

6.E: Periodic Functions (Exercises)

  • Page ID
    17850
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    6.1: Graphs of the Sine and Cosine Functions

    In the chapter on Trigonometric Functions, we examined trigonometric functions such as the sine function. In this section, we will interpret and create graphs of sine and cosine functions

    6.2: Graphs of the Other Trigonometric Functions

    This section addresses the graphing of the Tangent, Cosecant, Secant, and Cotangent curves.

    6.3: Inverse Trigonometric Functions

    In this section, we will explore the inverse trigonometric functions. Inverse trigonometric functions “undoes” what the original trigonometric function “does,” as is the case with any other function and its inverse. In other words, the domain of the inverse function is the range of the original function, and vice versa.