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Mathematics LibreTexts

Chapter 3: Radical Functions and Equations

  • Page ID
    28779
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    • 3.1: Rational Exponents
      Rational exponents are another way of writing expressions with radicals. When we use rational exponents, we can apply the properties of exponents to simplify expressions.
    • 3.2: Adding/Subtracting/Multiplying Radicals
      Adding radical expressions with the same index and the same radicand is just like adding like terms. We call radicals with the same index and the same radicand like radicals to remind us they work the same as like terms.
    • 3.3: Dividing (Rationalizing) Radicals
      We have used the Quotient Property of Radical Expressions to simplify roots of fractions. We will need to use this property ‘in reverse’ to simplify a fraction with radicals. We give the Quotient Property of Radical Expressions again for easy reference. Remember, we assume all variables are greater than or equal to zero so that no absolute value bars re needed.
    • 3.4: Radical Equations
    • 3.5: Complex Numbers

    Thumbnail: The mathematical expression "The (principal) square root of x". Image used with permission (GPL, David Vignoni (original icon); Flamurai (SVG convertion); bayo (color)).