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Mathematics LibreTexts

4: Fractions

  • Page ID
    4997
  • [ "article:topic-guide", "authorname:openstax", "showtoc:no" ]

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    Often in life, whole amounts are not exactly what we need. A baker must use a little more than a cup of milk or part of a teaspoon of sugar. Similarly a carpenter might need less than a foot of wood and a painter might use part of a gallon of paint. In this chapter, we will learn about numbers that describe parts of a whole. These numbers, called fractions, are very useful both in algebra and in everyday life. You will discover that you are already familiar with many examples of fractions!

    Figure 4.1 - Bakers combine ingredients to make delicious breads and pastries. (credit: Agustín Ruiz, Flickr)

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