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Mathematics LibreTexts

5: Curve Sketching

Whether we are interested in a function as a purely mathematical object or in connection with some application to the real world, it is often useful to know what the graph of the function looks like. We can obtain a good picture of the graph using certain crucial information provided by derivatives of the function and certain limits.

Thumbnail: Some local maximum points (A) and minimum points (B).