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Mathematics LibreTexts

9: Comparing 2 Averages

  • Page ID
    21527
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    • 9.1: Two Population Means with Unknown Standard Deviations
      The comparison of two population means is very common. A difference between the two samples depends on both the means and the standard deviations. Very different means can occur by chance if there is great variation among the individual samples.
    • 9.2: Comparing Two Independent Population Proportions
      Comparing two proportions, like comparing two means, is common. If two estimated proportions are different, it may be due to a difference in the populations or it may be due to chance. A hypothesis test can help determine if a difference in the estimated proportions reflects a difference in the population proportions.
    • 9.3: Matched or Paired Samples
      When using a hypothesis test for matched or paired samples, the following characteristics should be present: Simple random sampling is used. Sample sizes are often small. Two measurements (samples) are drawn from the same pair of individuals or objects. Differences are calculated from the matched or paired samples. The differences form the sample that is used for the hypothesis test. Either the matched pairs have differences that come from a population that is normal or the number of difference