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Mathematics LibreTexts

Chapter 12: Vector-valued Functions

  • Page ID
    9029
  • [ "article:topic-guide", "license:ccby" ]

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    • 12.1: Vector-Valued Functions and Space Curves
      Our study of vector-valued functions combines ideas from our earlier examination of single-variable calculus with our description of vectors in three dimensions from the preceding chapter. In this section, we extend concepts from earlier chapters and also examine new ideas concerning curves in three-dimensional space. These definitions and theorems support the presentation of material in the rest of this chapter and also in the remaining chapters of the text.
    • 12.1E: Exercises for Section 12.1
    • 12.2: The Calculus of Vector-Valued Functions
      To study the calculus of vector-valued functions, we follow a similar path to the one we took in studying real-valued functions. First, we define the derivative, then we examine applications of the derivative, then we move on to defining integrals. However, we will find some interesting new ideas along the way as a result of the vector nature of these functions and the properties of space curves.
    • 12.2E: Exercises for Section 12.2
    • 12.3: Motion in Space
      We have now seen how to describe curves in the plane and in space, and how to determine their properties, such as arc length and curvature. All of this leads to the main goal of this chapter, which is the description of motion along plane curves and space curves. We now have all the tools we need; in this section, we put these ideas together and look at how to use them.
    • 12.3E: Exercises for Section 12.3
    • 12.4: Arc Length and Curvature
      In this section, we study formulas related to curves in both two and three dimensions, and see how they are related to various properties of the same curve. For example, suppose a vector-valued function describes the motion of a particle in space. We would like to determine how far the particle has traveled over a given time interval, which can be described by the arc length of the path it follows.
    • 12.4E: Exercises for Section 12.4
    • 12.5: Acceleration and Kepler's Laws
      We have now seen how to describe curves in the plane and in space, and how to determine their properties, such as arc length and curvature. All of this leads to the main goal of this chapter, which is the description of motion along plane curves and space curves. We now have all the tools we need; in this section, we put these ideas together and look at how to use them.
    • 12.5E: Exercises for Section 12.5
    • 12.E: Chapter 12 Review Exercises