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Mathematics LibreTexts

1: Introduction to Scientific Computing

  • Page ID
    53644
  • This page is a draft and is under active development. 

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    So you picked up (or probably actually clicked on) this text and maybe you wonder what Scientific Computing actually is. This will give a brief overview of the field and try to explain with some actual examples. In short, scientific computing is a field of study that solves problems from the sciences and mathematics that are generally too difficulty to solve using standard techniques and need to resort to writing some computer code to get an answer.


    This page titled 1: Introduction to Scientific Computing is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Peter Staab.

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