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Mathematics LibreTexts

3: Fractions

  • Page ID
    57178
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    • 3.1: Proportions
    • 3.2: Visualize Fractions (Part 1)
      A fraction is a way to represent parts of a whole. The denominator b represents the number of equal parts the whole has been divided into, and the numerator a represents how many parts are included. The denominator, b, cannot equal zero because division by zero is undefined. A mixed number consists of a whole number and a fraction. When a fraction has a numerator that is smaller than the denominator, it is called a proper fraction, and its value is less than one.
    • 3.3: Visualize Fractions (Part 2)
      Equivalent fractions are fractions that have the same value. When working with fractions, it is often necessary to express the same fraction in different forms. To find equivalent forms of a fraction, we can use the Equivalent Fractions Property. We can use the inequality symbols to order fractions. Remember that a > b means that a is to the right of b on the number line. As we move from left to right on a number line, the values increase.
    • 3.4: Multiply and Divide Fractions (Part 1)
      A fraction is considered simplified if there are no common factors, other than 1, in the numerator and denominator. If a fraction does have common factors in the numerator and denominator, we can reduce the fraction to its simplified form by removing the common factors. To multiply fractions, we multiply the numerators and multiply the denominators. Then we write the fraction in simplified form.
    • 3.5: Add and Subtract Fractions with Common Denominators
      To add fractions, add the numerators and place the sum over the common denominator. To subtract fractions, subtract the numerators and place the difference over the common denominator.
    • 3.5: Multiply and Divide Fractions (Part 2)
      The reciprocal of the fraction a/b is b/a, where a ≠ 0 and b ≠ 0. A number and its reciprocal have a product of 1. To find the reciprocal of a fraction, we invert the fraction. This means that we place the numerator in the denominator and the denominator in the numerator. To divide fractions, multiply the first fraction by the reciprocal of the second.
    • 3.7: Add and Subtract Fractions with Common Denominators
      To add fractions, add the numerators and place the sum over the common denominator. To subtract fractions, subtract the numerators and place the difference over the common denominator.
    • 3.8: Add and Subtract Fractions with Different Denominators (Part 2)
      In fraction multiplication, you multiply the numerators and denominators together, respectively. To divide fractions, you multiply the first fraction by the reciprocal of the second. For fraction addition, add the numerators together and place the sum over the common denominator. If the fractions have different denominators, first convert them to equivalent forms with the LCD. Likewise, for fraction subtraction, subtract the numerators and place the difference over the common denominator.