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5.2: A Model for Hyperbolic Geometry

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    89858
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    Hyperbolic geometry can be drawn with the aid of the Poincaré disc model. The hyperbolic plane is represented by a disc with the border not included ("open disc" in analysis terms). Lines are either diameters or circular arc that are orthogonal to the disc. The origin is the center of the disc. You will use the provided Geogebra file or one you search for online in Geoegebra with special tools to explore hyperbolic geometry.

    Construct each of the following hyperbolic figures.

    1. Triangle using at least two lines that are diameters.
    2. Triangle using exactly one line that is a diameter.
    3. Triangle using no lines that are diameters.
    4. Quadrilateral (Can you make it a square?)

    Explore parallelism in hyperbolic geometry.

    1. Construct a line and select a point not on that line. Construct two lines through that point parallel to the given line.
    2. How many lines through that point parallel to the given line could be constructed?
    3. Do any of these parallel lines have special properties? Properties might be easier to describe in terms of the model.
    4. Construct two parallel lines. For ease make them large and close in the model. What seems to be true about the distance between the parallel lines?

    This page titled 5.2: A Model for Hyperbolic Geometry is shared under a GNU Free Documentation License 1.3 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Mark A. Fitch via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.