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Mathematics LibreTexts

2: Set Theory

  • Page ID
    82981
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    The Manipulatives listed below are to be used with this workbook. You will be using the material cards to make your own manipulatives in order to do hands on activities in some of the exercise sets. You should prepare them ahead of time, and keep each type of manipulative in its own baggie. The manipulatives to be used in an exercise set are listed at the beginning of that set. You should also have handy a calculator, scissors, tape, colored pencils, pens, markers, highlighters and/or crayons.

    Everything you always wanted to know about sets but were afraid to ask . . .

    My mom and best girlfriend, Barbara Browne, taught me to ask questions. She taught me not to be afraid to ask what, how or why. I learned to be inquisitive and to form my own beliefs. This carries over to my philosophy about learning and understanding mathematics. It's not enough to believe something simply because a teacher or parent tells you it's true. You must be able to prove to yourself the validity of any argument. You must yourself be convinced before you can pass on the ideas to others. You must really understand and own the concepts. That is why I believe in a hands–on approach to learning by discovering the concepts through investigation and exploration. Mom gave me the foundation that started me on my own journey of learning.

    Thank you, Mom.


    This page titled 2: Set Theory is shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Julie Harland via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.