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Mathematics LibreTexts

4: Addition and Subtraction

  • Page ID
    82994
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    This is just

    2 good

    + 2 be

    _________

    4 gotten

    My dad, John Browne, always made learning fun for me. It was always a game, whether it was learning all the states and capitols, the presidents in order or basic math facts. I never had to drill. I loved doing flashcards and competing with anyone to see who could shout out the answer first. Neither of my parents liked or did well in math, but they only shared the positives and the fun of learning to me. Now, I teach my dad arithmetic tricks for fun and he teaches them to anyone who will listen -- including me. Then, I say "But Dad, I taught you that trick last year!" We both know the best way to learn and then remember anything is to teach someone else. Thanks Dad.

    Thumbnail: The abacus is a calculating tool that has been in use since ancient times and is still in use today. The abacus consists of a number of rows of movable beads or other objects, which represent digits. One of two numbers is set up, and the beads are manipulated to implement an operation involving a second number (e.g., addition), or rarely a square or cubic root. (Unsplash Lisense; Crissy Jarvis via Unspash)


    This page titled 4: Addition and Subtraction is shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Julie Harland via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.