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Mathematics LibreTexts

2: Geometry

  • Page ID
    109868
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    • 2.1: Basic Geometric Concepts and Figures
      You use geometric terms in everyday language, often without thinking about it. For example, any time you say “walk along this line” or “watch out, this road quickly angles to the left”, you are using geometric terms to make sense of the environment around you. In the world of mathematics, each of these geometric terms has a specific definition. It is important to know these definitions—as well as how different figures are constructed—to become familiar with the language of geometry.
    • 2.2: Perimeter, Circumference, and Area
      Quadrilaterals are a special type of polygon. As with triangles and other polygons, quadrilaterals have special properties and can be classified by characteristics of their angles and sides. Understanding the properties of different quadrilaterals can help you in solving problems that involve this type of polygon.
    • 2.3: Volume of Geometric Solids
      Living in a two-dimensional world would be pretty boring. Thankfully, all of the physical objects that you see and use every day—computers, phones, cars, shoes—exist in three dimensions. In the world of geometry, it is common to see three-dimensional figures. Polyhedrons are shapes that have four or more faces, each one being a polygon. These include cubes, prisms, and pyramids. Sometimes you may even see single figures that are composites of two of these figures.
    • 2.4: Exercises
      This page contains 27 exercise problems related to the material from Chapter 6.

    Thumbnail: A two-dimensional perspective projection of a sphere (CC BY-3.0; Geek3 via Wikipedia).


    This page titled 2: Geometry is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Darlene Diaz (ASCCC Open Educational Resources Initiative) via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.