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Mathematics LibreTexts

1: Functions

 

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  • 1.0: Prelude to Functions
    In this chapter, we will explore functions that are a kind of relationship between parameters and their properties.
  • 1.1: Functions and Function Notation
    A jetliner changes altitude as its distance from the starting point of a flight increases. The weight of a growing child increases with time. In each case, one quantity depends on another. There is a relationship between the two quantities that we can describe, analyze, and use to make predictions. In this section, we will analyze such relationships.
  • 1.2: Domain and Range
    In creating various functions using the data, we can identify different independent and dependent variables, and we can analyze the data and the functions to determine the domain and range. In this section, we will investigate methods for determining the domain and range of functions.
  • 1.3: Rates of Change and Behavior of Graphs
    In this section, we will investigate changes in functions. For example, a rate of change relates a change in an output quantity to a change in an input quantity. The average rate of change is determined using only the beginning and ending data. Identifying points that mark the interval on a graph can be used to find the average rate of change. Comparing pairs of input and output values in a table can also be used to find the average rate of change.
  • 1.4: Composition of Functions
    Combining two relationships into one function, we have performed function composition, which is the focus of this section. Function composition is only one way to combine existing functions. Another way is to carry out the usual algebraic operations on functions, such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. We do this by performing the operations with the function outputs, defining the result as the output of our new function.
  • 1.5: Transformation of Functions
    Often when given a problem, we try to model the scenario using mathematics in the form of words, tables, graphs, and equations. One method we can employ is to adapt the basic graphs of the toolkit functions to build new models for a given scenario. There are systematic ways to alter functions to construct appropriate models for the problems we are trying to solve.
  • 1.6: Absolute Value Functions
    Distances in the universe can be measured in all directions. As such, it is useful to consider distance as an absolute value function. In this section, we will investigate absolute value functions. The absolute value function is commonly thought of as providing the distance the number is from zero on a number line. Algebraically, for whatever the input value is, the output is the value without regard to sign.
  • 1.7: Inverse Functions
    If some physical machines can run in two directions, we might ask whether some of the function “machines” we have been studying can also run backwards. In this section, we will consider the reverse nature of functions.
  • 1.E: Functions (Exercises)

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